Disaster

GIS (Spatial) story maps and Disaster Management

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Introduction An important part of disaster management is the communication of information to stakeholders. It can by disaster management practitioners and/or the public. Mechanisms to do this must keep up with the times. The question is also what format of reporting will enhance the ability to utilize data or information from disaster risk assessments? What happen to the hardcopy reports after the assessment? Does in gather dust in the cabinet? How fast can you retrieve information from the report? Can you easily link information from the report to a specific location? Can you apply your own thinking to do analysis on the data in the report? This post is about the investigation if story maps, as used in ESRI online, can be used for reporting results of disaster risk assessment. Story maps What is story maps? “Esri Story Maps let you combine authoritative maps with narrative text, images, and multimedia content. They make it easy to harness the power of maps and geography to tell your story.” https://storymaps.arcgis.com Disaster risk assessment’s story is about the description of hazards and risks and showing the possible impact areas including communities, environment and infrastructure. What better way to describe the impact by doing it with maps linked to a narrative describing the impact. This is where story maps comes in. Example The following images show screenshots of a story map.  The story starts with a dashboard show some information of possible risk per ward in the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipalities area of jurisdiction.  This dashboard is interactive and depends on information from risk assessments.  The following tab shows the risk value per ward.  The third map shows the location of possible water pollution points in the municipality.  A narrative is added to describe the map which can include for example disaster risk methodology, recommendations and/or standard operational procedures.                                                                                                                                                                               

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GIS throught tweets

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By following thought leaders and innovative people and companies on social media, existing trends and future development in GIS can be found.  I discuss a few below. What do you inside a building when your #GPS stops working? You switch to #indoor positioning services: https://t.co/toh4s5MKw7@geoworldmedia #indoorpositioning #IPS #positioning #GIS #technology #navigation — Living Map (@LivingMap) February 26, 2018 An existing trend that is becoming more popular these days are indoor location navigation but also analysis.  Safe time by going directly to the shop you need to be or plan your mall experience better. Analysis of location of businesses inside a shopping centre can result in the optimal location of retail outlets. #BigData tools and predictive #GIS analytics helped Chicago #police reduce shooting rates in 2017 https://t.co/tCJ1fSreq8 — Esri Australia (@esriaustralia) February 26, 2018 Analysis of Big Data is becoming more and more the domain of Geographic Information Sciences.  We can argue that GISc practitioners have been doing it for a long time but the emergence of powerful hardware and software (including computer learning) make it “less” complex with a wider user base and application possibilities.   This is pretty cool! Where #GIS meets #BIM using the @Esri platform in the UK for #AEC mapping the future of #SmartCities https://t.co/qf0TdmO6HV pic.twitter.com/Ex1x0ZVZlD — Eos Positioning (@EosGNSS) February 22, 2018 Yes, smart cities are here to stay and smart buildings make cities smarter.  Question is how do you integrate smart buildings with smart cities.  Yes, GIS will be part of the solution   Implementing Predictive Analysis with ArcGIShttps://t.co/1bVM7G2hI9#gis pic.twitter.com/q3YZG4Tdgf — Monde Geospatial (@MondeGeospatial) February 19, 2018 GISc practitioners have done this for a long time.  Better visualisation through 3D display, augmented reality, business intelligence display software is making the results more accessible and applicable to more people and businesses.

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Free State Provincial GIS Forum Meeting – 15 February 2018

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Dr Booysen presented GIS and Disaster Risk Assessment during the GIS Forum.  Methodology for risk assessment and using GIS with some examples were discussed. Aspects of the presentation include: Disaster Risk Assessment. Important GIS elements for Disaster Risk Assessment 5 elements of GIS; GeoDesign and a GIS project plan. Download the slideshow from: Free State GIS Forum A discussion about using Capital Framework to assess vulnerability.   A discussion of important aspects in using GIS for Disaster Risk Assessment.